December 16, 2013 “Walkers in the City: Young Jewish Women with Cameras” | The Arizona Center for Judaic Studies

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December 16, 2013 “Walkers in the City: Young Jewish Women with Cameras”

Deborah Dash MooreDeborah Dash Moore, Director of the Jean and Samuel Frankel Center
for Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan.

“Walkers in the City: Young Jewish Women with Cameras”

December 16, 2013
Deborah Dash Moore, Director of the Jean and Samuel Frankel Center for Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan.
Time: 7:00pm
 Location:  The Tucson Jewish Community Center (3800 E. River Rd)
 free and open to all

Beginning in the 1930’s, Jewish photographers established a new mode of American street photography. Mostly working-class young people, they produced a striking cultural efflorescence and set out to remake photography and the way New Yorkers were perceived. This lecture explores the work of four Jewish women photographers before and after World War II.

Prof. Deborah Dash Moore is the Frederick C. L. Huetwell Professor of History at the University of Michigan and Director of the Jean and Samuel Frankel Center for Judaic Studies.  She is the author of At Home in America: Second Generation New York Jews (1981), GI Jews: How World War II Changed a Generation (2004), and To the Golden Cities: Pursuing the American Jewish Dream in Miami and L. A. (1994). Prof. Dash Moore received a Jewish Cultural Achievement Award in 2013 from the Foundation for Jewish Culture.

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